Courses

Spring 2014

LOBO GARDENS COURSE

Communication & Journalism 393

Instructor Maggie Siebert

8 weeks, 2nd

3-credit course

Meets 4 times: March 28, April 4, 18 and May 2.  9 am – 5 pm  (An additional minimum out-of-class 7 hours per week will be flexibly scheduled according to your course project)

This is an academically grounded experiential learning course dedicated to envisioning and maintaining long-term community food gardens and food outreach on UNM campus. We will examine issues of ecological sustainability through the lenses of communication and culture. Our work will also be hands-on. The course will involve active and focused creative teamwork. Some of class time will take place off campus, learning and volunteering in urban community farms and gardens.

Students’ major experiential projects will be the growth and maintenance of UNM’s 3-year old campus community food and medicinal herb gardens.

For more information, contact Maggie Siebert at magnify@unm.edu. Please email the instructor if you have a time conflict and need a course override.

PS: Lobo Gardens is the coolest class offered at UNM.

Fall 2013

LANGUAGE, THOUGHT & BEHAVIOR

Communication & Journalism 318

Professor Tema Milstein

3-credit course

Examination of the influence of language on perception, evaluations, mass media, creativity and interpersonal relations. Includes garden-focused activities, and project development.

For more information, please visit the course catalog online, or contact Dr. Tema Milstein at tema@unm.edu.

Fall 2013

SUSTAINABILITY SKILLS PRACTICUM

Instructor Maggie Seeley

Sustainability Studies Program 334

3-credit course

A collaborative hands-on local sustainability project directly benefiting the campus or community, designing creative approaches to satisfy basic needs (such as food, health, energy, transportation) in a future-sustaining way.

Prerequisite: SUST 134.

Summer 2013

LOBO GARDENS CLASS

Professor Tema Milstein

Communication & Journalism 393
Sustainability Studies 402*

3-credit course

Meets 9 am – 5 pm: June 7, 14, 21, 28
(An additional minimum out-of-class 7 hours per week in June will be flexibly scheduled according to your course project)

This is an academically grounded experiential learning course dedicated to envisioning and maintaining long-term community food gardens and food outreach on UNM campus. We will examine issues of ecological sustainability through the lenses of communication and culture. Our work will also be hands-on. The course will involve active and focused creative teamwork. Some of class time will take place off campus, learning and volunteering in urban community farms and gardens.

Students’ major experiential projects will be the growth and maintenance of UNM’s 3-year-old campus community food and medicinal herb gardens.

* SUST 402 may be taken for graduate academic credit.

For more information, contact Dr. Tema Milstein at tema@unm.edu.

2012 Courses:

SUST 364 – Growers’ Market Practicum

CRP 470 – Sustainable Foodsheds

ANTH 340 – Anth & Local Small Farming

SUST 402 – Permaculture Design I / II

Other UNM Food Related or Lobo Gardens COURSES:

(Visit unm.edu for a complete offering of scheduled courses, by semester.)

Social Movements – AMST 309.001 (CRN# 39850)

T/R – 2:00 – 3:15 pm

This course examines the dynamics of community activism and movements for social change in the United States. In addition to exploring the organizational methods, tactics, and political, cultural, and social efficacy of various social movements, this Research Service Learning class affords students the chance to be a part of the sustainable food movement through active participation in the on-going development of community gardens on the UNM campus. Students will be planting, building, landscaping, harvesting, meeting, and organizing fellow students while exploring community gardens as sites for social and cultural resistance, community building, and organizing for positive change around issues of social and environmental health. Texts include Vandana Shiva’s Stolen Harvest and Protest Nation: A Century of American Radicalism. Contact Andrew Marcum for more info: amarcum@unm.edu.

Food and Natural Resources – Geog 464/564

M/W/F – 2:00-2:50 pm

This course provides an advanced introduction to food geography.  Human activities have altered all of the Earth’s ecosystems.  Yet humans are also components of ecosystems, because we are entirely reliant upon plants, animals, fungi, and bacteria for food. Food is a direct and ubiquitous connection all humans share with the Earth’s biophysical environment. Every day, everyone makes choices about which foods to eat, how to prepare and eat these foods, and how to dispose associated wastes.  Cumulatively, our daily food choices have profound ecological effects for Earth’s natural environments, and also link us to farmers and other people around the world.  This course examines both why we eat what we eat, and how our food choices affect other people and places around the world. For more information contact: Chris Duvall at duvall@unm.edu.

Language, Thought and Behavior – CJ318.004 (CRN# 42057)

M/W – 1:00 – 2:15 pm

This course explores the intersections of language, thought, and behavior. We define “language” broadly in this class, including symbolic (verbal, textual, etc.) and nonverbal (visual, spatial, environmental, etc.) communication. As a class, we will largely focus on specific themes of culture and place to unpack how meanings, relations, and realities are socially constructed through communication. In addition to developing critical thinking skills to raise our awareness, we will explore how communication can be used to transform the world in which we live. The class will especially focus on local discourses that might support more sustainable or restorative perceptions and practices, with a special focus on community gardens. Critical and creative exploration as well as out-of-the-classroom service experiences in the wider community will be central to the learning experience. Together, through readings, lectures, examples, discussion, research, service-based learning, and experiential field studies, we will expand our repertoire to begin to understand how: 1) Communication research can be used to deconstruct and critically investigate the linkages between language, thought, and behavior; 2) Communication informs, constructs, and transforms perception and behavior. For more information, contact Dr. Tema Milstein at tema@unm.edu.

Sustainability Practicum for Campus and Community – SUST 334

Day/Time Currently Unknown

SUST 334 is a “sustainability in action” course which focuses on practical projects. Something sustainable gets called forth and created. In the (5) years of SUST 334 being offered at UNM, students have built a bio-diesel processor, created and run the LOBO Growers’ Market, constructed a simple water catchments trough, audited local businesses (using The Triple Bottom Line model), established a campus energy reduction program “Education is Power”, developed eye-catching Recycling bins, established Lobo Gardens on campus and led a High School Outreach project. Student teams begin work immediately, starting with a vision, proceeding through a planning function, which ends in project completion  A community is created among the students who work together. INSTRUCTOR: Maggie Seeley, UNM Sustainability Studies Program. E-mail: msseeley@unm.edu, 277-3431 (UNM office) or 268-3339 (cell).

Ethnology of Local Farming – ANTH 340.005 (CRN# 30810)

Tue/Thur 3:00-4:45

The focus of this course is to engage students in the small-scale farming community of Albuquerque’s South Valley region. Students will incorporate literary resources, theoretical approaches, and field methods into a service learning pedagogy that couples academic investigation with field-based activities. Students will study and experience the current popular movement, political ramifications, and cultural influences of growing organic produce on small-scale farm plots. Ultimately, students incorporate ethnographic field methods through semester projects as a potential contribution and/or enhancement the operations of small farms in Albuquerque’s South Valley. This course addresses the issues of food security, economic development, and sustainability from a global perspective while responding to the very issues with local forms of action and activism. Ability to travel to the South Valley required and social science or sustainability studies background preferred. INSTRUCTOR: Patrick W. Staib-Flores, (505)277-4524. Room: Hibben Center Room 125.

History of PAST COURSES

SUMMER 2011 Lobo Gardens Course:

Lobo Gardens – SUST 402 – Section 8 (CRN: 20837)

3-credit course meets June 10, June 24, July 8, July 22; 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (An additional minimum out‑of‑class 4 hours per week will be flexibly scheduled according to your course project)

This is an academically grounded experiential learning course that is dedicated to envisioning and maintaining long-term community food gardens on UNM campus. The class will examine issues of ecological sustainability through the lenses of communication and culture. Our work will also be hands-on. The course will involve active and focused creative teamwork. Some of class will take place off campus, learning in urban community farms and gardens. Students’ major experiential project will be the intensive growth and maintenance of UNM’s 1-year-old campus community food gardens. Course may be taken for graduate academic credit. For more information, contact Dr. Tema Milstein at tema@unm.edu.

Summer 2011 Related Courses:

Place-Based Agriculture –  SUST 402.004 (CRN: 20766)

June 6 –June 30 – M/T/W/R, 9:00 am –12:00 pm

In Place-Based Agriculture, students will explore a sense of place and gain experience in community-based agricultural practices through a variety of learning approaches, including lectures, field trips, and involvement in local farms and gardens. Emphasizing hands-on application of community-based and ecological principles, the course seeks to bridge the gap between academia and the working world by not only teaching concepts of local food security, but also offering practical training in agricultural practices and applied community food system planning. Students will contribute to the early stages of two community garden installation projects, and will come away with a greater understanding of how food security relates to a sense of place, systems thinking, deep ecology, and community planning as it applies to organic agriculture. Note: This course is intended to compliment the Lobo Gardens class, SUST 402.007* (CRN: 20148), in terms of timing and subject matter, holding a greater emphasis on off-campus gardening and community-based practice. 3 Credit hours. For more information, please contact: Koby Jesckeit-Hagen at kjeschke@unm.edu or Brin Andrews at andrews@unm.edu.

Foodshed Field School – SUST 402.001 (CRN# 20132)

June 6 through July 2 –

Explore specific topics that address the environmental, economic, and social aspects of sustainability. Topics may include legacies of leaders in sustainability, development of foodsheds, and other innovations. The field school will visit four (4) major agricultural areas of the state, including farms, ranches, markets, processing facilities, and community food projects in traditional Hispanic, Native American, and other communities. Ten (10) nights will be spent out of town.  Students will develop land literacy, direct knowledge of the value chain, orientation to Hispanic and Native traditions through face-to-face meetings between rural and urban agriculturalists and students. Mentoring will be provided by faculty and off-campus partners. Students will conduct original research projects on foodshed-related topics. Interdisciplinary opportunities, such as topics courses, seminar series, social events, and student symposia will be available. 6 credit hours. Program Administrator: Terry Horger, thorger@unm.edu

Spring 2011 – RSLP Lobo Gardens Course:

Spring 2011 – Social Movements in America – AMST 309:002 (CRN 41604)

Tu/Th – 2:00pm-3:15pm

Course Description:  This course examines the dynamics of community activism and movements for social change in the United States.  In addition to exploring the organizational methods, tactics, and political, cultural, and social efficacy of various social movements, this Research Service Learning class affords students the chance to be a part of the sustainable food movement through active participation in the on-going development of community gardens on the UNM campus. Students will be planting, building, landscaping, harvesting, meeting, and organizing fellow students while exploring community gardens as sites for social and cultural resistance, community building, and organizing for positive change around issues of social and environmental health. Texts include Vandana Shiva’s Biopiracy and Protest Nation: A Century of American Radicalism. For More information, contact Andrew Marcum, Graduate Teaching Instructor: amarcum@unm.edu.

Spring 2011 – Related Courses:

Spring 2011 – Sustainable Futures – UNIV 175 (CRN 40091)

Tu/Th – 1:00am-12:15pm

A Living and Learning Community Course open to all UNM Freshman.
This course is designed for students interested in applying the principles of sustainability to their everyday lives and future careers. Students will be introduced to various elements of sustainability and environmental health through active participation in the creation of community gardens as part of UNM’s Lobo Gardens initiative. In addition to exploring and acting upon questions surrounding the environmental, economic, and social justice aspects that comprise the “triple bottom line” of sustainability, students will have the opportunity to meet with, and learn from, professionals working towards sustainable futures in the fields of building and design, food and agriculture, renewable energy, social equity, and public health. For more information contact the instructor, Andrew Marcum, at amarcum@unm.edu.

Spring 2011 – Sustainable Foodsheds – CRP 470/570-005 (CRN 25741)

M/W – 4:00-5:15pm

Planners are playing an increasing role in determining how food systems are structured through national and local policies, and how they might promote and advance community-based strategies and movements, especially those that include marginalized, low-income, indigenous and migrant populations. During this course we will discuss terms and concepts including foodshed, food security, food safety and food justice, among many others. We will look at how the infrastructure of food systems either supports or threatens these concepts and how we can move towards a more localized food system with the aim of achieving a sustainable foodshed. Professor: David Henkel. Graduate Assistant: Lora Roberts. For more information contact Lora at lrober14@unm.edu.

Spring 2011 – The Anthropology of Food – ANTH 340

Wed – 6:30-9:30pm (UNM West Campus)

In light of the escalating concerns over environmental degradation and its negative impact on our food system, various groups are organizing food justice movements across the world. These movements are critiquing the political and economic impacts of gentrification and agri-business upon food consumption and environmental health. Our study of these movements will highlight the ways in which groups autonomously create sustainable solutions to food injustice on both a local and global scale. We will explore the relationship of these movements to agriculture in both urban and rural settings, enriched by the stories of different peoples’ connection to their food and land. We will also examine why food production has historically been and continues to be a key component of how members of a society organize themselves as well as express different cultural norms and identities. Contact instructor: Christina Mello, cmello@unm.edu

Spring 2011 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems – GEO381L/499

Have you used MapQuest to map an address? Perhaps used Google Earth to see a satellite image of your neighborhood? Ever wondered how these technologies work?  Enroll in GEOG 381L this Spring semester to learn the fundamentals of GIS and how it is revolutionizing the way we view and analyze our world. For more information contact: Dr. Paul Zandbergen at 277-3105 or zandberg@unm.edu. Also see www.paulzandbergen.com for more information about the instructor.

Dates: January 18 through May 5, 2011
Lecture: TR 9:30 – 10:45 a.m. in Bandelier East 105
Lab: T 10:50-12:40 (CRN21423), T 14:05-15:55 (CRN14428), R 10:50-12:40
(CRN31221) or R 14:05-15:55 (CRN39057) in Bandelier East 106

Spring 2011 – Land Literacy: Tools for Making Out(side) – ARTS 389

M/W – 10:00-12:50pm

A poetic/practical exploration of land. Readings, walkings, and doings. For more information contact Assistant Professor of Art and Ecology, Catherine Page Harris.

Fall 2010 – RSLP Lobo Gardens Course:

Topics in Social Movements – AMST 309 (CRN 39850)

Tu/Th – 2:00pm-3:15pm

An interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of social movements, focusing on cultural and social formations of these movements. Topics include: folklore of social movements; labor struggles; peace movements; land conflicts.

Fall 2010 – Related Courses:

Language, Thought, and Behavior – CJ 318 (CRN 15164 / 15165)

Tuesdays & Thursdays:

Section 001 (CRN 15164): 9:30 a.m.-10:45 a.m.

Section 002 (CRN 15165): 12:30 p.m.-1:45 p.m.

This course explores the intersections of language, thought, and behavior. The class will especially focus on local discourses that might support more sustainable or restorative perceptions and practices, with a special focus on community gardens. Critical and creative exploration as well as out-of-the-classroom experiences in the wider community will be central to the learning experience.

Food and Natural Resources – GEOG 464 (CRN 35453/35454)

M/W – 4:00pm-5:15pm

Students gain an advanced introduction to the social and environmental effects of individual food choices, through the analysis of the sociocultural and biophysical relationships embedded in various agricultural and food productions systems.

South Valley Small Farming: The Culture of Small Farming in the Middle Rio Grande Region During the Harvest Season – ANTH 230.003 (CRN:39451)

M/W/F – 3:00-3:30pm

This course invites students to initiate ethnographic field projects with small‐scale farmers in the South Valley region of Albuquerque. Through course materials and field experience, we will address themes of food security, locally produced food, organic farming, sustainability, and water rights from an anthropological perspective. Students will contribute to the efforts of the Agri‐Cultura Network, a member‐owned farm collective based in the South Valley, in the form of farm labors, marketing development, and awareness raising. This is a Research Service Learning Course and as such students will be required to travel to farm sites in the South Valley weekly.

Seminar – Experiential Learning – UNIV 175 005 (CRN: 40226)

T/Th – 2:30 – 4:15pm

A 12-week dual credit course which will be taught at South Valley Academy involving high school students in ag-related research and service. Dual credit reserved for South Valley Academy students.